St. Paisius Hilendarski was canonized as a saint on 26.06.1962 by St. Synod of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church. He is a spiritual person - hieromonk and Bulgarian folk awakener. In 1762, after many years of wandering, gathering information, and after leaving the Hilendar monastery, he completed his monumental work "Slavic Bulgarian History" in the Zograf monastery.

On June 19, the Bulgarian Orthodox Church celebrates the memory of St. Paisii Hilendarski (1722-1773)

On June 19, the Bulgarian Orthodox Church celebrates the memory of St. Paisii Hilendarski (1722 – 1773). St. Paisiy Hilendarski was canonized as a saint on 26.06.1962 by the Holy Synod of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church. He is a spiritual person - hieromonk and Bulgarian folk awakener. In 1762, after many years of wandering, gathering information and after leaving the Hilendar monastery, he completed his monumental work "Slavic Bulgarian History" in the Zograf monastery. Professor Marin Drinov believes that his story marks the beginning of the Bulgarian revival. One of the oldest transcripts of its history can be seen in the National History Museum, which dates back to the late 60s. Apart from the purely factual part, Paisius' History contains and begins with a chapter on the utility of history. Here we publish this chapter for the attention of our readers:

In the National History Museum, one of the oldest copies of the History of Slavonic Bulgaria can be seen, which dates back to the end of the 60s.

“The Benefit of History
To know the things that happened before in this world, and the deeds of those who lived on earth, is not only useful, but very necessary, all-wise reader. If you accustom yourself to read these things often, you will be enriched with understanding, you will not be very unskilful, and you will be able to answer little children and simple people, when by chance they ask you about the deeds of ecclesiastical and civil history that happened earlier in the world. And you will be no less ashamed when you cannot answer for them.

From where will you be able to obtain this knowledge, if not from those who wrote the history of this world and who, although they did not live long, for no one is granted a long life, for a long time left writings about these things. We cannot learn by ourselves, because the days of our life on earth are short. Therefore by reading the old annals and by foreign skill we must make up the insufficiency of our years for the enrichment of reason. Do you want to sit at home and learn, without a very difficult and dangerous journey, the past of all the kingdoms of this world and the events now taking place in them, and use this knowledge for the intelligent enjoyment and benefit of yourself and others, read history! Do you want to see as in a theater the play of this world, the change and destruction of great kingdoms and kings and the fickleness of their prosperity, how the dominant and proud tribes among the nations, strong and invincible in battles, glorious and honored by all, suddenly weakened, they humbled themselves, fell, perished, disappeared—read history, and learning from it the vanity of this world, learned to despise it. History gives reason not only to every man to govern himself or his house, but also to great rulers for good government: how they can keep their God-given subjects in the fear of God, in obedience, quietness, righteousness, and piety, how to tame and root out rebels, how to fight against external enemies in wars, defeat them and make peace. See how great the benefit of history is. In short, this is what Basil, the Eastern Caesar, said to his son Leo the Wise. Advising him, he said: "Do not stop," he said, "reading the history of the ancients." Because there you will easily find what others have worked hard for. From them you will learn the virtues of the good and the crimes of the wicked, you will know the vicissitudes of human life and the vicissitudes of prosperity in it, and the impermanence of this world, and how even great states tend to fall. You will reflect and see the punishment of the wicked and the reward of the good. Beware of them!”

The most famous portrait of Paisii Hilendarski by the artist Koyu Denchev (1920 – 1984)
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